Monday, December 01, 2008

poem, 1

taut, to auto


poem, 2

Chloris chloris (the greenfinch) is a tautonym.


poem, 3

comma, roulette



found haiku

merrily, merri-
ly, merrily, merrily
life is but a dream



The Amsterdam Bed-In

"Begin——"
"Stop——"
"Break——"
"Go on——"
"All right——"
"And——"
"Leave that bit out——"
"Finish it——"
"Fine——"
"A bed-in? I don't follow you——"



Still-Life with Bonsai and Mauve Dancing Girl

informal upright
formal upright
slant

rock clasping
root over rock
slant

clump

swimming
cascade
literati

informal upright
formal upright
clump

forest
broom
rock clasping
twin trunk
multi-trunk
slant

clump

Monday, November 17, 2008

Saturday, November 01, 2008








a noun sing e·ratio 11 · 2008

with poetry by David Appelbaum, Donald Wellman, Mary Ann Sullivan, Joseph F. Keppler, Patrick Lawler, James Stotts, David Annwn, David Rushmer, Melanie Brazzell, Jennifer Juneau, John M. Bennett, Geof Huth, John Mercuri Dooley, Mark Cunningham, Derek Owens, Gautam Verma, and Clark Lunberry



Monday, September 22, 2008






















Thérèse Dreaming

"I believe deeply in the genius of painting, which parallels that of childhood. I've used painting as a language without really having decided to do so, because it suits me better than writing. Writing tries to be too explicit and go directly to a meaning. . . . For me, writing can only be in the ellipses, where I express myself. . . ."

--Balthus

Wednesday, August 06, 2008

My prose poem, “Untitled No. 2,” has been translated into français by Éric Dejaeger (and appears in the print ’zine, Microbe, #48, Juillet-Août 2008).


Sans titre n˚2

L’artiste peint sur sa toile deux vieux citoyens grisonnants. Ils sont tous deux perdus et leurs corps bégayent: vers l’est, vers l’ouest, arrêtent le mouvement, repartent, arrêtent le mouvement, repartent. L’un deux, une femme, elle veut l’autoroute. L’autre, un homme, il recherche la place du marché. La femme est maintenant un oiseau—un oiseau brun commun sans marques distinctives—et elle s’envole de la toile. Le vieil homme, vu qu’il a deux pieds gauches, marche en rond dans le sens opposé aux aiguilles d’une montre.


Untitled No. 2

The artist paints upon his canvas two old and graying citizens. Both are lost and their bodies stutter: Eastward, westward, stop movement, start, stop movement, start. One of them, a woman, she wants the highway. The other, a man, he is searching for the marketplace. The woman is now a bird—a common brown bird with no distinctive markings—and she flies off the canvas. The old man, since he has two left feet, walks on into counter-clockwise circles.


Thursday, June 12, 2008




KOPPÁNY WAVES TO E·RATIO EDITIONS

E·ratio Editions is happy to announce the publication of Waves, an e-chap by Márton Koppány.

Waves by Márton Koppány. "These works are minimalist by design, but should we paraphrase the thought channeled therein, the effect would be encyclopedic, ranging through philosophy, psychology, politics, and the human emotions."

Also available from E·ratio Editions:

#1. In the Bennett Tree. Gregory Vincent St. Thomasino joins John M. Bennett “In the Bennett Tree.” Collaborative poems, images, an introduction and a full-length critical essay pay homage to American poet John M. Bennett.


"Goings On" from In the Bennett Tree.

’Twas a lark, the sheaf in Hamburg
(empty form, “flit-fingered” in a lot);

sepsis-clothes and “high” remember,
glittered dark—

the rank of clouds and GOINGS ON.
“Wet-” parked, clawed sore, flown,

removed and so rainy off your Beth,
I “But, but, but” your flaily “Nein.”



#2. Mending My Black Sweater by Mary Ann Sullivan. Mending My Black Sweater and other poems by Mary Ann Sullivan. Poems of making conscious, of acceptance and of self-remembering, and of personal responsibility.

Click here to see Mary Ann Sullivan's digital/interactive poem, Shaking the Spiders Out.


taxis de pasa logos

Monday, May 12, 2008





NEW FROM E·ratio Editions.

Mending My Black Sweater

Mending My Black Sweater and other poems by Mary Ann Sullivan. Poems of making conscious, of acceptance and of self-remembering, and of personal responsibility.

Click here to see Mary Ann Sullivan's digital/interactive poem, Shaking the Spiders Out.

Also available: #1. In the Bennett Tree.  Gregory Vincent St. Thomasino joins John M. Bennett “In the Bennett Tree.” Collaborative poems, images, an introduction and a full-length critical essay pay homage to American poet John M. Bennett.


Monday, April 21, 2008





Announcing E·ratio Editions.

E·ratio Editions, a series of elegantly produced, quick loading e-chaps featuring poetry, innovative narrative prose and recollection and critical and theoretical essays.

Just published: #1. In the Bennett Tree.  Gregory Vincent St. Thomasino joins John M. Bennett “In the Bennett Tree.” Collaborative poems, images, an introduction and a full-length critical essay pay homage to American poet John M. Bennett.


"Eaten" from In the Bennett Tree.

Off your edgy blonde / stiff / “couch” talk—
cure(-ator’s) unsaid (maid) docent, ’er

heaven’s bent-more norm(atic) jerkings (“leg show”)
behind the screen and off the hedge flaunt.

I sought, I mouth’d all through EATEN cank’r
for the curator’s plastic buttocks. Tall & dominant.

(Face it, Miss Sanders, it’s your neotorso.) No
concrete assurance in this “rubberite’s” world, but

diap’r’d elders’ emissions (“commodity”), style
tribes, “tight-lacing,” catsuits, “our master key.”



E·ratio Poetry Journal and E·ratio Editions, edited by Gregory Vincent St. Thomasino.

E·ratio publishes poetry in the postmodern idioms with an emphasis on the intransitive.

Thursday, January 17, 2008

Some samples from Go Mirrored which is now included in the e-chap Six Comets Are Coming available for free download from E·ratio Editions.












































































The digital traduction is at once a translation and a transmission, a giving over and a return. To the poet, and the poetics of chora, the ultimate success is entirely fortuitous, ah but that is the dominant seventh!

From the introduction:

When you can control what you have no control over, it is no longer a matter of control, but of cooperation, coordination, and receptivity. That is, when assuming a posture (a comportment—a matter of the sensibilities) of "least resistance" ["I have no desire to program you."] towards the technology. [And not unlike "apprehending" a "ready-made."]

The technology doesn't know it is "creating poetry." [Language—or in this case, symbols for signifiers for specific letters, symbols and punctuation marks—doesn't know when it is poetry. But what if it did?]
The technology has no consciousness. The technology doesn't know it is "creating." Stochastic traductions are happening all the time. Are you conscious of this? What is the ambit of your "overall"?


"It goes without saying that dissonances and noises are welcome in this new music.  But so is the dominant seventh if it happens to put in an appearance." —John Cage

"Truth is the revealing of what is concealed." —Martin Heidegger

Tuesday, January 08, 2008

I became interested in Christopher Smart back in 1978 by way of the composer Benjamin Britten.  Britten’s ‘Rejoice in the Lamb’ (a Festival Cantata) is a setting of parts from Smart’s long poem, Jubilate Agno.  Included (in Britten’s cantata) are some lines from what is probably Smart’s best known lines, ‘For I Will Consider My Cat Jeoffry.’  Here Smart takes his beloved cat as an example of nature praising God by being simply what the Creator intended it to be.  Probably the popularity of this poem is due to its inclusion in Pound’s anthology.  (Bucke does not include Smart on his list of instances—lesser, imperfect or otherwise—but I think maybe so.)

And now, Hooting Yard present a complete reading of Christopher Smart's Jubilate Agno with Frank Key and Germander Speedwell.


Dear Frank,

Once again I thank you for bringing this reading/recording to my attention. It is simply extraordinary. It is excellent, it is historical. And if I may, I think it is remarkable the having a female voice in the response, this makes the listening easier, never monotonous (never wearisome!). The voices compliment and complement each other. Smart is my affinity, my kin. He is encyclopaedic. I sense so deeply his sense of isolation, I am so deeply moved by his sense of isolation and frustration. At the 1:56 time there begins the part "For I Will Consider My Cat Jeoffry" and at that pont I followed along in my text. This complete reading of Jubilate Agno has not only been a pleasure and an education for me, it has been an episode.

Yours sincerely,
Gregory

Friday, January 04, 2008






a noun sing e·ratio 10

With poetry by Josie Schoel, Carol McCarthy, Chris McCreary, John Lowther, Robert Gibbons, Mary Ann Sullivan, J. Crouse, Prakash Kona, and Alan Halsey