Friday, October 19, 2007

From a review of Go (from Sidereality v.2, #2) by Lewis LaCook:

"The Go poems strike me as a carefully reconstructed mirror turned on language itself. In his introduction, St. Thomasino makes clear his concern with the eidetic, the visual, qualities of every poem. Here he's quite masterfully crafted a reading experience radically different from any experience those who have never encountered visual poetry would expect. One doesn't read these poems line-by-line; one wades into them, drawn on by the sonic and visual reverberations St. Thomasino has hung there on the page. A linear reading is impossible here; instead, the reader must tune herself to the simultaneity of disparate linguistic elements. The closest live experience to these poems would be walking through an international airport, catching snatches of conversation in a number of different languages, 'understanding' some of them, simply marveling in the phenomenal beauty of the rest. These poems capture language as it is lived."

Go is now included in the e-chap Six Comets Are Coming available from E·ratio Editions.

From Florent Fajole, editor of Manglar out of Marseille, France:

"The chosen way, with space-time, fragments and constellation dynamisms, including also elements of unfixed syntax, is really convincing. Among other things, this poetic situation belongs certainly to a complexity well known by all the persons that use several languages: semantical and syntaxical complementarity, but also hiatus, structural incompatibilities, and therefore conflicts of many kinds. It’s an expanding language which develops new meanings and makes comprehensive what can be language placed far from unilateral ways of thinking and representing articulations, relationships but also solitude: the beginning of an open entity, identity, and on the other hand the end of closed identity."

Two of my Go poems have inspired the poet and composer Jukka-Pekka Kervinen to compose musical compositions: "Go six" as "Reflections I" and "Go eleven" as "Reflections II".  I like the title, "Reflections." It's a form of "mirroring."

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